Interstisial Sistitis (Diagnosa yang mungkin bagi permasalahan perkemihan yang tak kunjung sembuh)

Monday, December 13, 2010

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Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a condition that results in recurring discomfort or pain in the bladder and the surrounding pelvic region. The symptoms vary from case to case and even in the same individual. People may experience mild discomfort, pressure, tenderness, or intense pain in the bladder and pelvic area. Symptoms may include an urgent need to urinate, a frequent need to urinate, or a combination of these symptoms. Pain may change in intensity as the bladder fills with urine or as it empties. Women’s symptoms often get worse during menstruation. They may sometimes experience pain during vaginal intercourse.

 

People who have interstitial cystitis may have the following symptoms:

  • An urgent need to urinate, both in the daytime and during the night (yet you may pass only very small amounts of urine each time)
  • Pressure, pain and tenderness around the bladder, pelvis and perineum (the area between the anus and vagina or the anus and the scrotum). This pain and pressure may increase as the bladder fills and decrease as it empties in urination.
  • A bladder that won't hold as much urine as it used to
  • Pain during sexual intercourse
  • In men, discomfort or pain in the penis or scrotum

For many women, the symptoms get worse before their menstrual period. Stress may also make the symptoms worse, but it doesn't cause them.

 

The therapy for interstitial cystitis (IC) begins with extensive patient education regarding the chronic nature of the disease and realistic assessments of the condition, prognosis, and potential responses to therapy. Ongoing reassurance and physical and emotional support are important as the diagnostic evaluation progresses and therapies are applied. Only rarely will patients with interstitial cystitis have an immediate, complete, and durable response to any particular therapy. They must be counseled at length regarding the lack of universally effective therapies. Often, referral to one of the local interstitial cystitis support groups, especially a local chapter of the Interstitial Cystitis Association, can be helpful in providing a continuing network of support for the patient.

Ideally, in clinical practice, the treatment of interstitial cystitis should be initiated with the least invasive, least expensive, and most reversible therapy. In general, this consists of a program of dietary and fluid management, time and stress management, and behavioral modification. Thereafter, treatments are applied in a progressively more invasive step-wise fashion until some degree of symptomatic relief is obtained.

Interventions might include various pharmacological agents (eg, pentosan polysulfate sodium [Elmiron], antihistamines, tricyclic antidepressants, analgesics, anti-inflammatory agents), intravesical therapy (ie, medications intermittently instilled directly into the bladder via a catheter), electrical stimulation, and complementary therapies such as acupuncture and hypnosis.

Managing the pain component can be difficult in patients with interstitial cystitis. The etiology of the pain remains unclear, but various authors have postulated the etiology to be mediated centrally, peripherally, or locally via a neurogenic or inflammatory mechanism. Some patients require long-term pain medications, while others rely on these only during periods of symptomatic flares. Anti-inflammatory agents, acetaminophen, gabapentin (Neurontin), tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and various other agents are used. Most clinicians tend to avoid the extensive use of narcotics in patients with interstitial cystitis. When the pain component becomes unresponsive to nonnarcotic agents, referral to a chronic pain management facility may be helpful.

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) units, electrical stimulation (intravaginal), acupuncture, and intrathecal and intraspinal infusions have all been used. Topical anesthetics such as lidocaine have been applied directly to the bladder intravesically and have yielded some success.

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